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Work

We partnered with Kokosing Industrial to launch their WCM & digital experience.

October 6, 2015
Kokosing Industrial is the largest construction contractor in the Midwest and operates in markets such as Power, Marine, Oil & Gas, Heavy Civil and Commercial. Through a highly collaborative effort, we helped redesign and relaunch their web platform that now generates a new level of respect and appreciation for the beauty, complexity and scale of the Kokosing Industrial capabilities. We led the Kokosing Industrial team through a strategy workshop that helped them rethink the purpose and value of their website. This resulted in a new information architecture and content hierarchy as well as a new digital brand position. Leveraging their existing brand standards, we created a new digital design language focused on great typography, minimalist design, and beautiful photography that became the centerpiece of the new website.
Events

We packed the coolers, grabbed our paddles, and hit the Scioto river.

September 9, 2015
For our creative recharge this quarter, we packed the coolers, grabbed our paddles, and hit the Scioto river for a fun-fulled afternoon of canoeing. For most of us, it was a relaxing float down the river, brainstorming new ideas, thinking of ways to enhance our capabilities and planning for the future. However, for a few feisty paddlers, more of the river was in their boat than outside of it. But regardless of the sailing technique, the water carried us home with new stories, soggy shoes, and an energized appetite for new challenges. At Clutch, we believe that great experience inspire great ideas. Interested in joining a team that loves new challenges? Contact Keith Maughan at jobs@meetclutch.com.
News

Bryan Lee joins as Director of User Research & Strategy.

August 10, 2015
Bryan joins Clutch from Precision Dialogue, an Engagement Agency in Westlake, OH, where he was the Research and Customer Experience Director. In his role at Precision Dialogue, he worked with new and existing clients in the retail, entertainment, healthcare, and financial services industries to help create tailored UX design and research strategies and approaches to help them create unique and effective experiences for their customers. Prior to Precision Dialogue, Bryan worked at Nationwide Insurance where he was a UX Researcher and Account Manager on the User Experience team.
News

Greg Smith joins as Executive Director of Clutch.

June 29, 2015
Greg Smith has joined Clutch as Executive Director.  In this role, Greg will lead Clutch as well as continue to expand the organizational capability as it relates to user-centered research, strategy, and design. Greg brings over eighteen years of experience in the UX field and a diverse background both leading user experience teams at Fortune 100 companies as well as experience working within agency/consulting environments.  Prior to joining Clutch, Greg was Vice President of User Experience & Design at Allstate where he was accountable for design across the Enterprise.  Greg also built and led the user experience team at Nationwide Insurance.  He has worked across a variety of vertical industries throughout his career including leading major projects at Marriott, Nextel, Netscape and 24 Hour Fitness. The customer journey and collaboration spaces are critical to the future of Clutch. We are now positioned to build these services into other deliverables that we currently offer.
News

Clutch wins Best Healthcare & Wellness Interactive Work.

April 23, 2015
Clutch wins Best Healthcare & Wellness Interactive Work at the Ohio Interactive Awards for the NCTN Research Navigator project done in partnership with the Nation Cancer Institute.
Insights

Responding creatively to a responsive world.

September 22, 2014
The experience of creating content in our digital world has changed. Screens are everywhere. Smartphones, tablets, laptops, desktops, TVs, watches, even refrigerators! With so many variations to respond to, there is an obvious need to rethink our creative process. Seven years ago, before Steve Jobs blessed us with second screen iPhone bliss, there was one universally accepted size when designing for the web: 1024×768. Looking back, it was a simpler time. Just set up your Photoshop document to a 960 grid and you could ride off into the sunset. But by today’s standards, an interface needs to respond to sizes from 320px to 1920px and everything in between. In this responsive world, creating a single layout just doesn’t cut it, and you’ll be selling your brand short if you think it will. As the ecosystem of digital devices continues to expand, the expectation of multi-screen design is the new normal. Because of this, the way we think as the creative agency needs to be as responsive as our websites. At Clutch, we’ve had to rethink our process for this new era, and in doing so we realized 3 things: The world is more than just 3 screen sizes. We have to consider orientation, is the screen 16×9, 9×16, 4×3, or 3×4? And don’t forget pixel density for those retina displays… The most important question to ask when we design responsively is not which sizes to layout, but rather what happens between those sizes. Static layouts from Photoshop or PDFs are no longer enough to accurately communicate what the digital experience will be. Clients need to physically interact in order to provide contextual and authentic feedback. Now, instead of thinking “mobile first”, we’re thinking “context first” in order to prioritize content and user experience based on the need, device, and location of the user. We’re finding ways to take our concepts from wireframe to tactile experiences on real devices faster, saving time and creating more thoughtful review sessions. The outcome of this new process has begun to blur the distinct lines between our UX, Creative, and Development specialists. It’s created a more unified vision within our agency and the brands we collaborate with every day. But most of all it has allowed us to be more innovative, bringing ideas and brand experiences to life faster and in higher fidelity than they ever have before.
Insights

After the Ice Age.

September 17, 2014
The Future of Social Fundraising. Copy-Cats. Brace your feeds for a number of “me too” campaigns doing similar antics in hopes of gaining a fraction of the IBC success. We suspect social communities won’t have a lot of patience for it for the exact same reason the Ice Bucket Challenge was such a success. “Been there done that:” Calling out your friends on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram to do something crazy to raise awareness or money won’t be avant-garde enough to get the mass appeal of the original campaign The magic is gone: Exponential growth becomes impossible when you can’t get critical mass to take up the banner. No matter how important the cause, it will quickly become drudgery. Scrutiny on Spending. The IBC is a social miracle. It’s the non-profit equivalent of the average Joe hitting the lottery. And just as it is with the newly minted millionaire, the ALSA will receive its share of visits from “long-lost cousins” and seemingly can’t miss research and fundraising opportunities. Will the organization have the discipline and experience to focus its efforts properly and keep greedy hands out of the cookie jar? If not, the media will be ready to pounce. Greater Discretion of Giving. While the uptake of the challenge is undeniable, there is also sub-discussion in social media about whether all this giving and dumping is really responsible. At first blush it sounds unreasonable, however, I encourage you to read Mike Rowe’sFacebook post on August 27th. He put together a really compelling and polite argument for why he’s choosing not to participate. Additionally, how well the ALSA manages its newly found funds will likely impact not only the future of their organization’s fundraising efforts but other large-scale non-profits as well. Anything that makes donors uneasy could have a spillover effect on other worthy charities. If the funds aren’t believed to be put to good use, cynicism could win out over generosity and wallets will become tightened for other charities. What the ALSA Needs to do Next. Here are 3 things that the ALSA needs to get right in the near term to ensure long term success: Outline a new vision. The association didn’t really ask for these funds, they were an unexpected gift. It’s likely their strategic plan didn’t account for this windfall either. It owes its donors a new plan that outlines how these funds will help them achieve their goals. Keep the new donors engaged in order to support the organization on an ongoing basis. What a tremendous success this campaign has been in not only raising money but also awareness on a disease that’s been forced to the shadows. The association now has a base that they must continue to educate. How well it harnesses its base in the next 12-months will set a trajectory on fundraising in the future. It must turn these new donors into ambassadors for the cause, and repeat donors, if it is to sustain the research necessary for a cure Be disciplined and transparent in
Insights

Beyond the bucket.

September 8, 2014
So the ice bucket is empty, we’ve toweled off, and even had a chance to read some really interesting perspectives on why the Ice Bucket Challenge (IBC) worked so well. We agree with much of what is being shared about the elements that contributed to its viral success—that it was easy to do, fun, worthwhile, personal and time sensitive. But something we explored that we didn’t see discussed much yet was the timing of some of the most socially influential celebrities’ participation in the Ice Bucket Challenge relative to donations and new donors. This led us to consider another factor that we believe contributed (albeit indirectly) to keeping the campaign viral: The social celeb. We charted the donation and new donor data from the ALS Association press releases, which started August 11. We discovered a correlation between the participation of the most socially influential celebrities in the IBC and the growth of ALSA donors and donations. Surprisingly, when the most socially influential celebs were participating, donations doubled not just once but twice. But correlation does not always mean causation (as our friends at Farsite remind us), especially when you consider the rules of the challenge. Participants challenged new participants directly—typically 3 at a time—so the impact of celebrity on the challenge was probably more indirect (though Justin Beiber did challenge all his “Beliebers” when he took the challenge the second time). Instead, celebrities brought attention and awareness to the cause through their social networks and made it more newsworthy for traditional media—a double whammy. And perhaps just as important, their participation gave the challenge the necessary cool factor and the ability to participate right alongside some of the biggest stars—something we regular Joes and Josephines typically don’t get to do. Would the IBC been a success without celebrity involvement? Yes. But we believe social celebrity influence took it over the top.
Insights

Teaching kids to code.

July 17, 2013
I was at my daughter’s softball game last night and a fellow parent asked me about teaching kids to program. I get the question a lot. In this case the kids were 7-10 years old, but the range has run the gamut from 5 to 18. Good news: I don’t think resources for this have ever been better or easier to come by. Here are a handful of resources I recommend. http://pluralsight.com/training/Courses/TableOfContents/teaching-kids-programmingThis is by far the best course I’ve come across. It seems to be geared toward kids in the elementary and middleschool age range. High school students may find the tone of the course skews too young for them, but if they can suppress their egos for a few hours it’s a fun course for them as well. What makes this a great course is that the target audience is just as much parents as it is kids. It focuses as much on the how to teach as the what to teach. It uses C#/.NET. http://www.teachingkidsprogramming.com/ The two authors of the above course also run this site. The concepts I think are be similar to the above, but it looks like they use SmallBasic as a language. Full disclosure: I haven’t personally used this site. http://pluralsight.com/training/Courses/TableOfContents/javascript-from-scratchThough not one of the free resources, this course looks very promising if you want to use JavaScript as your language of choice for learning. I haven’t used this course either, but on the reputation of Pluralsight and Jesse Liberty, the course author, I’d say this is likely a very good course and well worth the subscription cost. Pluralsight has 7 other courses also listed in the Beginner Programming section: http://pluralsight.com/training/Courses http://www.code.org/ Code.org is a nonprofit that was launched fairly recently with the goal of increasing programming proficiency among students. Their site has an ever growing list of resources. http://channel9.msdn.com Channel 9 is a Microsoft community around development. It’s basically an enormous stockpile of technology videos covering topics for all skill levels. I found this specific list published there for beginners: http://channel9.msdn.com/posts/Beginner http://microsoftvirtualacademy.com. Microsoft has Virtual Academy, It’s free, but it’s geared as much toward professionals as beginners. In order to write code, you’ll need a tool to develop in. Many of the resources out there are geared toward a specific development environment and they will probably take you through steps of setting up that particular set of tools. I happen to think the Microsoft tooling is the best available. A well kept secret (or a poorly publicized benefit) is that Microsoft has a whole set of tooling available for free. DreamSpark, https://www.dreamspark.com/what-is-dreamspark.aspx, is a Microsoft program that gives students free access to a large number of professional tools and resources. It will get you access to the full blown version of Visual Studio, which is what professional developers use to create Microsoft applications. Microsoft also produces a set of free development tools that go under the Visual Studio 2012 Express for… moniker. The Express versions of Visual Studio are limited when compared with the full version of the product,

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